Well I’m back from Las Vegas and pretty much caught up (finally!) despite my sick daughter who disrupted my schedule one afternoon this week; not complaining, I love being Daddy still, especially since she’s 17 and those opportunities are getting fewer and farther between so I’ll take ’em when they come along.  I actually had to take her to the doctor, but fortunately it’s just a normal bug, not the swine flu – but the schools are taking any illness very seriously these days.

The conference was great, and I very much enjoyed presenting on the topic of onboarding and mingling with our partner (www.nowsolutions.com) and meeting some of their customers.  I love talking about onboarding, as I think it’s one of the greatest opportunities companies have today to save major money; it’s amazing that so many companies have yet to automate this process.  Thanks again to Laurent, Jennifer, Luiz, Pierre, Marianne, Arthur and everyone on the NOW team for their wonderful hospitality!

I think the presentations (I did 2) were very well received.  My first presentation was an overview of the onboarding process and focused on how it can deliver ROI, with much content drawn from our “Best Practices” brief, that’s quickly becoming one of our most popular pieces of content (funny how well received organized lists, ala “suggestions”, can be).  I’m more than happy to provide you with a copy of my presentation(s) if you’d like; just shoot me an email or leave me a comment.

What I think struck me most from my presentations last week were how valuable a comprehensive approach to addressing errors & omissions is in the onboarding process.  Having demonstrated how a great onboarding system (ours, of course) can eliminate E&O in new hire paperwork and data collection, many in the audience told me later during the conference how many systems they had looked at that fall short in this area, and that they see this as not only an important objective in onboarding, but THE important objective in onboarding.  Basically, creating a nice new employee experience is important, but not as important as ensuring that the i’s are dotted and the t’s are crossed when it comes to the new hire package.  Well, I’m glad we’ve got it straight in our product.

Another observation from the conference was that our Canadian friends to the north have the same pains and challenges as do we in the states.  So I’m obviously glad to say that we can automate Canadian hiring processes with as much flexibility and attention to addressing errors & omissions as we can U.S. hiring processes; and what’s more, we can meet Canadian dual language requirements (not to mention ANY language requirement).

One final observation.  I go to Vegas a couple of times a year, and the trips last year seemed to forbode of the recession: there were empty seats on my flight, the airport was quiet, the hotels lacked their normal bustle and excitement.  Last week was quite a bit different: my flights were full, the airport was a major headache with the worst crowds I’ve seen in years, and the hotel (even staying out at Lake Las Vegas, where the conference was) was busy with multiple conventions and conferences.  Perhaps Vegas is one of those “early indicators”, and if so, the rest of 2009 is looking pretty darn good.

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